Adaptation pyramid for Delfland Water Board

Infographic shows pyramid model with natural resilience as foundation

Customer
Location
Duration
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Delfland Water Board
Delfland
2023

Adaptation pyramid for Delfland Water Board

Infographic shows pyramid model with natural resilience as foundation

Customer
Location
Duration
Read more
Delfland Water Board
Delfland
2023

The Delfland Water Board is a partner in our Monitoring Lab Climate Adaptation. There is a strong sense within the water board that climate change calls for a transition: a transition towards restoring the natural resilience of the water system. But how do you gain insight into whether you are already well on the way towards this transition? Delfland asked us to create an infographic that shows how far Delfland is in climate-proofing its territory. An infographic that allows Delfland to communicate its vision on natural resilience to its administrators in a visually appealing way.

Hasse Goosen weet alles over dit project

What does the infographic show?

To draw attention to restoring natural resilience, we devised the adaptation pyramid for this project. This pyramid visualises that natural resilience is the foundation of your system. And also that it is not sustainable in the long run to take all kinds of technical measures that are in fact in the wrong place. The broader the base of natural resilience, the less you need to invest in technical measures. The top part of the pyramid shows that you always have to accept, to some extent, that the extremes will increase. That is why it is also important to make people aware that we have to learn to live with certain risks.

What is the role of CAS?

We carried out the project together with SWECO: SWECO conducted interviews with different people within the water board. CAS developed the infographic. We used knowledge and experience in other monitoring projects. And together with SWECO and the water board, we worked on a concise text to accompany the infographic.

What happens to the infographic?

The infographic was printed as a leaflet and distributed to the Delfland administrators, among others. We are now further developing the concept of the adaptation pyramid. In the Monitoring Lab, we will also continue with this concept: with our partners Vallei and Veluwe and the municipalities of Dordrecht, Ede and Apeldoorn, we want to further develop this concept in such a way that it can eventually form the basis for a monitoring system. The idea is that this system not only provides insight into what is happening and how much is being done, but also into the way we are working: are water and soil guiding our adaptive policies? Are we building natural resilience or are we mainly using a sticking plaster approach?

What does the infographic show?

To draw attention to restoring natural resilience, we devised the adaptation pyramid for this project. This pyramid visualises that natural resilience is the foundation of your system. And also that it is not sustainable in the long run to take all kinds of technical measures that are in fact in the wrong place. The broader the base of natural resilience, the less you need to invest in technical measures. The top part of the pyramid shows that you always have to accept, to some extent, that the extremes will increase. That is why it is also important to make people aware that we have to learn to live with certain risks.

What is the role of CAS?

We carried out the project together with SWECO: SWECO conducted interviews with different people within the water board. CAS developed the infographic. We used knowledge and experience in other monitoring projects. And together with SWECO and the water board, we worked on a concise text to accompany the infographic.

What happens to the infographic?

The infographic was printed as a leaflet and distributed to the Delfland administrators, among others. We are now further developing the concept of the adaptation pyramid. In the Monitoring Lab, we will also continue with this concept: with our partners Vallei and Veluwe and the municipalities of Dordrecht, Ede and Apeldoorn, we want to further develop this concept in such a way that it can eventually form the basis for a monitoring system. The idea is that this system not only provides insight into what is happening and how much is being done, but also into the way we are working: are water and soil guiding our adaptive policies? Are we building natural resilience or are we mainly using a sticking plaster approach?

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